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Elf

The sound of Samp

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As a point of interest for myself, I've moved this post over to a new thread regarding the sound of music Samplitude.

I had my tries with Reaper V1 and V3 and while I liked a lot of things (routing especially), it clearly couldn't compare to Samplitude in terms of transparency and editing capabilities. I did some project in parallel with faders thrown, plug-ins, bussing and the like and to my ears it made a huge difference soundwise. Well, yes, it is stated to have 64Bit sound, but for my ears, to no avail.

I am presuming you mean that the sound of Samp is preferable?

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........and yet I hear that a DAW is a DAW and cannot sound any different to another. I have Reaper and X1 Essential, but by the time I've switched from one to the other, I can't remember what the other sounded like?

I seem to be able to turn the channels up more in Samp than Sonar - with the same song data. I dropped a song from Reaper into Sonar and had to repeatedly attenuate the drums to stop them peaking, which I had no problem with in Reaper. I put the same song over into Samp 11 Pro and I can turn the drums back to their original position and there still appears to be more available headroom.

I had thought that this was down to my inexperience and the different presentation of the meters?

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I've heard the difference among playback engines going as far back as 1994. I used to beta test gobs of DAWS and had a lot of them running at once, and I used the same test bed of audio files to check them all. One to another there are differences. Could you pick that difference out when listening to any single file on it's own? No. So it is a distinction without a point. Heinz catsup is distinct and unique and any other catsup on your burger will not taste the same. The mixes created in any DAW is not, on your radio or CD player or media player, going to be obviously from any particular vendor.

That said, a lot of mastering engineers love Samp.... and I'm talking about guys still using version 7 so they have not even gotten the newer tools and capabilities of the following versions or Sequoia. I mention mastering engineers because they tend to have the superior listening situations and the most critical ears.

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I've heard the difference among playback engines going as far back as 1994. I used to beta test gobs of DAWS and had a lot of them running at once, and I used the same test bed of audio files to check them all. One to another there are differences. Could you pick that difference out when listening to any single file on it's own? No. So it is a distinction without a point. Heinz catsup is distinct and unique and any other catsup on your burger will not taste the same. The mixes created in any DAW is not, on your radio or CD player or media player, going to be obviously from any particular vendor.

That said, a lot of mastering engineers love Samp.... and I'm talking about guys still using version 7 so they have not even gotten the newer tools and capabilities of the following versions or Sequoia. I mention mastering engineers because they tend to have the superior listening situations and the most critical ears.

So are the engines that drive the different DAW's proprietary, there's not just "a 32bit " studio engine algorithm or something, are they all individually built from the ground up?

I noticed too, last night, I'm actually adding gain to my piano on the first song I've moved from Sonar (X1 Essential) in the mixer and I've still got headroom. It wasn't like that in Sonar - I didn't have the NI NY Grand when I was using Reaper.

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So are the engines that drive the different DAW's proprietary, there's not just "a 32bit " studio engine algorithm or something, are they all individually built from the ground up?

Yes, they are all proprietary, although I'm sure that many of them may have similar approaches. Being a software developer myself (mostly database-driven applications written in Microsoft Visual FoxPro 9), I can assure you that there are a virtually unlimited number of ways to perform the same task in code, with some methods working better than others. I suspect that's where the perceived difference in the "sound" of different DAW's come from--the difference in the summing algorithms.

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I suspect that's where the perceived difference in the "sound" of different DAW's come from--the difference in the summing algorithms.

I can sort of see that now, although I take Bill's point too about not being able to notice as a solo example.

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