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Archiving numerical contents, issue solved ?...

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Archiving has been since a long time a problematic issue.

Seems that with M-DISC we could have now a pretty satisfying solution for audio datas, and maybe for much more (with 100 GB M-DISC writable Bluerays BD-R XL, some HD videos could be saved too).

One commercial link (for Europe) :

https://www.nierle.com/s01.php?shopid=s01&cur=eur&sp=en&ag=1&pp=sucheazu&zu=185&news=2228_kw11&letterid=1899

...1000 years (one thousand years), they say ?... :D

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Digital Long-Term preservation is not really a matter of choosing storage media. It's a matter of having a repository that can do migrations transparently and automatically. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Archival_Information_System#/media/File:OAIS-.gif

Thanks Sebastian, if my reminding is good you're specialised on this Digital Long-Term preservation topic, it's your job isn't it, so thank you for chiming in !...

You're talking from the point of view of a long-lasting industrial structure, and of course you're totally right from this point of view.

What you cannot dispute is that until this M-DISC appears, the digital storage medias lasted no more than +/- ten years before corruptions occur, and this has given many problems to many of us.

From the point of view of a rather craft structure, which is the case so far for many of us, this M-DISC about which we can reasonably believe that it can last easily at least a century (more than a man's life) without corrupting itself is a big change and quite cool, because not so expensive :D

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I don't see that any carrier format will ever change the paradigm of refreshing media every couple of years or so. Carrier disintegration is not the only factor in obsolescence. There are other critical issues such as carrier retrieval (players, software), information formats (file systems, file formats), and cost. M-DISC is rather costly per GB, and market penetration is rather low. I am sure that I would not consider it for those reasons.

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Market penetration is low, as it has always been with every new product at the beginning.

It is more than a carrier format (DVD-ROM and Blue-Ray are the formats in this case) : it's a substrate technology designed for long term-preservation (a thousand years they say, but a century could be enough for anyone peace of mind, when strictly no other storage media on the market can claim to last for a so long time without serious if not total self-degradation).

Verbatim going to M-Disc (and not only Milleniata & Co as it was at the very beginning some 5 years ago) could seem to be encouraging for the market penetration, at medium-term.

Blue-Ray format/technology seems to be remaining there for like 10-20 years at least, maybe much more (CD-ROMs have been there for some +20 years).

Right now, M-DISC price per GB is some -0,16€ with 25GB writable Blue-rays M-DISC (see commercial link below) ; it should go lower later ("market penetration" ; the price has already decreased)... 25GB being enough for audio files and large audio projects (and if needed, gigantic audio projects could be splitted on few 25 GB M-DISC ; if needed Winrar and others bit-to-bit archiving softwares seem to be there for lasting ; already more than 17 years) ; with conventional hardrives price per GB is about some 0,06€, 10 cents less than the current price of these 25GB M-DISCs but with no warranty it will last 10 years, so the existing need to constantly transfer and replace these hardrives when no such need exists with M-DISC substrate technology.
https://www.nierle.com/en/article/32558/Verbatim_M-DISC_Blu-ray_BD-R_25_GB_-_135_min,_4x,_Full_printable,_10_pieces_in_cakebox.html

As for the information formats (file systems, file formats), I guess we can safely assume all the current digital audio files will be safely retrieved in 20 years from now, if not 50 years from now (if no end of the world occurs). I guess it should be the same for digital video files. Every file formats from the 90's (27 years ago) can be safely retrieved today when the files are not corrupted because of the media degradation.

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